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Speakers
Friday May 26th. Francine Houben Francine Houben began to formulate the three fundamental concepts of her architectural vision whilst studying at the Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. Designing primarily for People, constructing spaces that are relevant to Place, and forging connections that give a building Purpose have remained consistent, underlying values to Mecanoo’s practice over the past three decades. Always seeking inspiration in the details of specific sites and locations, Francine bases her work on precise analysis coupled with an intuition built over three decades. She interweaves social, technical, playful and human aspects of space-making together in order to create a unique solution to each architectural challenge. Francine combines the disciplines of architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture in an untraditional way, with a profound sensitivity for light and beauty. Her use of materials, which often contrast in a complementary way, are the sum total of her creative expression.
Friday May 26th. Arjen Knoester Arjen Knoester studied Urbanism and Housing at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture. His experience as a designer, guest lecturer, concept developer and coach enables him to to work in the fields of Urbanism and Architecture. Knoester is currently senior urban designer for the urban planning department of the city of Rotterdam and partner/owner at Morfis Architecture and Urbanism in The Hague. His approach assumes opportunities and stems from imaginative, analytical and conjunctive qualities to realize collective ambitions. Having been involved in the city expansion plan Nesselande and the redevelopment of the harbors, he is currently spearheading the development of the city of Rotterdam. At his own firm Morfis his expertise lies in the urban projects. He’s convinced knowing about the motivations of legislators, custodians and inhabitants is essential in area development and maintenance. With this and knowledge about the neighborhood, district or city, something can be developed that the citizens will feel connected to.
Saturday May 27th. Kees Kaan Kees Kaan is an architect based in Rotterdam where he’s directing KAAN Architecten together with partners Vincent Panhuysen and Dikkie Scipio. They are leading an international team of architects, landscape architects, urban planners, engineers and graphic designers. Beforehand he was the co-founder and leader of Claus en Kaan Architecten from 1987-2013.Kaan graduated in Architecture at TU Delft in 1987. Examples of his work are the Netherlands Forensic Institute in The Hague, the Netherlands Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique, the Heimolen Crematorium in Sint-Niklaas and the Supreme Court of the Netherlands in The Hague. As full professor he is currently holding the Chair of Complex Projects of the department of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology. His research focuses on large-scale projects that characterize rapid global urbanization. Kaan is an international lecturer and sits on various juries and boards, both in the Netherlands and abroad. Numerous books and exhibitions have been dedicated to his body of work.
Sunday May 28th. Sou Fujimoto Sou Fujimoto is known for being awarded the Golden Lion at the 2012 Venice biennale for the Best National Participation. The title which captures the spirit of Common Ground, was awarded to the Japanese Pavilion in which leading international architect Toyo Ito collaborated with younger architects and with the local community to address the design of a new center for a region devastated by a national disaster in a practical and imaginative way. Since graduating from the University of Tokyo in 1994 and establishing his own office in 1994, Fujimoto has been exploring various themes in his designs all of which further explored during the week. THE CROWD: How does the individual relate to the group? THE INDIVIDUAL: How does the body relate to the spaces? THE HOME: What is the relation between the interior and the exterior? THE CITY: What is the relation between the natural and the artificial? He states that through exploring these questions we can come to determine a vision of architecture itself. This vision has been elaborated throughout his working career with projects such as T house, House N, The final wooden house, NA House and the Serpentine Gallery as well as in his winning proposal for the the Reinventer Paris competition spearheaded by Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo.
Monday May 29th. Peter Russell Peter Russell is dean of the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment since 2015. Before this, Peter Russell was Professor of Computer Supported Planning in Architecture (CAAD) at the RWTH Aachen University. He is a partner in architectural practice IP Arch GmbH and serves as vice-chairman of the German Architecture Dean's Council (DARL). He is also a founding member of the newly formed European architectural research network ARENA. Russell holds a bachelor in Environmental Design Studies from the Technical University of Nova Scotia, where he also obtained a master’s degree in Architecture. His vision for education at TU Delft can be summarised by the three A’s. Africa, Automation and Agility. He believes the greatest challenges for us as architects, designers and urbanists lie in the the Global South and in the rapidly urbanising continent of Africa in particular. Automation creates additional challenges as it requires an overhaul of our current infrastructure to accommodate new modes of transporting people and goods. In order to tackle global and local challenges education should connect with the local environment and businesses.
Monday May 29th. Floris Alkemade After graduating with honours at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture he joined Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), becoming partner from 2001 until 2008 when he founded his own firm FAA. Currently directing FAA and FAA/XDGA, Alkemade works on complex projects both within the Netherlands and abroad. He stands out due to his attention for infrastructure and logistics. Themes such as rezoning and urban development are also an important part of his work. In his work as an architect and urban planner, Alkemade, professor at the Academy of Architecture since 2014, champions the idea of the ‘tabula scripta’ or the ‘marked slate’. The architect is forced to relate a lot more to the existing conditions and to design on the basis of these conditions. Instead of a restriction this should be an opportunity to build on the potential. Due to his dedication to embedding interventions within the urban and landscape structure he has been appointed Chief Government Architect (Rijksbouwmeester) of the Netherlands.
Monday May 29th. Meta Berghauser Pont Meta Berghauser Pont is associate professor in Urban Design and Planning at Chalmers University in Gothenburg and leads, together with Lars Marcus, the research group SMoG (Spatial Morphology Group). Her research focus is Urban Morphology specializing in the quantification of urban form. She developed the Spacematrix-model which shows the relation between urban density and building typologies and its performativity in terms of for instance daylight access and urbanity. Recently this method is integrated with what is known as Space Syntax, a method to measure centrality of the urban network. The overall aim is to help us understand how urban form through density and centrality can support social, economic and ecological processes such as social segregation, local markets and biodiversity. https://www.smog.chalmers.se/
Monday May 29th. Ronald Wall Prof. Dr. Ronald Wall holds the ‘Chair of Economic Development of the City of Johannesburg’, at the School of Economic and Business Sciences,University of the Witwatersrand (WITS), Johannesburg. The Chair bridges the Faculty of Commerce Law and Management and the Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, and is established by the Municipality of Johannesburg. He is also the Head of the Urban Competitiveness and Resilience department, at the Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies (IHS), Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR). Wall is a qualified architect, urban planner and economic geographer. He received his PhD in economic geography from the Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam. His research concerns global, regional and urban economic development, on topics such as regional integration, economic competitiveness, sustainable cities, world city analysis, smart cities, food security, urban inequality, infrastructure, renewable energy, green economy and happiness economics. Central to Wall’s work is the understanding of cities as spatial-economic systems that bridge local, regional and global scales. Currently Wall’s focus is on African city development - particularly the relationship between urban economics, urban planning and urban design. He is the principal researcher and author of the upcoming UN-Habitat report ‘State of African Cities 2018: The Geography of African Investment’, a partnership between UN-Habitat and IHS-Erasmus University Rotterdam.
Tuesday May 30. Machiel van Dorst Machiel van Dorst is the chair of the OTB research department at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture. The objective of the OTB department is to contribute to solutions for societal problems, especially those related to the built environment. The focus is on scientific impact and social relevance Van Dorst is an environmental designer and is specialized in environment behavior interaction and sustainable development. Behavior research and design is related to control, social safety, community design, child friendly cities, health and stress reduction through design. For sustainable development the emphasis is on the combination of livability and ecological design. In his research for the book Privacy Script he concludes that control is an important aspect of our lives. He posits that it is of greater importance than social interaction as the need of being with and without people can then be balanced. Architecture has to facilitate real interaction by creating the opportunity to interact without forcing it. Control over social interaction is always important everywhere.
Tuesday May 30. Jesper Henriksson Jesper Henriksson is founder of the architectural practice Hesselbrand, based in London and Oslo. Their research and design focuses on new forms of living and working for an unpredictable way of life. He participated in the Venice biennale 2016 with a proposal for a house that is defined by spatial conditions rather than specific functions, to allow for a different form of flexible space. In his work Henriksson uses models to capture spaces through abstraction. Hesselbrand have attempted to provide the spatial cues for particular social situations without the spaces in which they typically appear. As soon as something becomes functioning architecture it is difficult to view it as standing for anything else. It no longer possesses the cast of the globally representative, but becomes specifically, restrictively sited instead. It loses its status, somehow, as representative art; hence why these particular objects are ‘Models’. Were they anything more concrete they would cease to be so powerful as abstractions.
Wednesday May 31st. Iwo Borkowicz Iwo Borkowicz, a recent graduate from the Faculty of Architecture of the Catholic University of Leuven (KU Leuven), has been awarded the prize, intended to support and develop the talent of recently graduated architects, urban planners and landscape architects, by Fundaciùo Mies van der Rohe. For his project, “A Symbiotic Relation of Cooperative Social Housing and Dispersed Tourism in Havana Vieja”, Borkowicz travelled to Cuba to do his research. There he could see first-hand how increasing luxury tourism and poverty are linked in this city. This situation encouraged him to develop architectural prototypes, to combine small scale tourism, social housing and entrepreneurship within the existing landscape of Havana.
Wednesday May 31st. Pieter Stoutjesdijk Stoutjesdijk envisions a combination of open-source design and local computer-controlled manufacturing to herald in a new type of industry in which the benefits of design and production are accessible and ideas as well as technology will be shared freely. For the Haiti house, based on an open, online database of digital construction component blueprints he developed for his 2013 graduation project at Delft University of Technology, Stoutjesdijk had to balance simplicity, adaptability, local needs, efficient use of materials, production time, structural requirements to resist external forces (e.g. hurricane winds), ease of assembly, and aesthetics. One of the objectives of his promotion of open source architecture has been its potential to not just influence the current building stock, but most importantly the 99% of buildings that are currently not designed by architects. His preferred model would thereby be a hybrid between open-source and closed-course as this in his vision leads to much greater quality and could potentially profit all actors in the process.
Wednesday May 31st. PK Das PK Das currently works in Mumbai as an and has been awarded the 2016 Jane Jacobs Medal for his efforts leading to the introduction of citizen participation in the citywide planning process. He has collaborated with activists and journalists to bring democratic planning and design to residents in the slums of Mumbai, a city with just one square meter of public space per 1000 inhabitants. His current engagement in creating a comprehensive plan for slum redevelopment and integration, turning the fragmented areas and waterways into revitalized and rehabilitated public spaces, is noteworthy. Das believes that in any country, but more so in a diverse, populous and unevenly developing country like India, architecture as well as the larger umbrella of town planning needs to be inextricably connected with larger public aspirations and the highest democratic ideals. Establishing a close relationship between architecture and people, placing a strong emphasis on participatory planning from the very beginning and at every stage, are the keynotes of this approach that manifests in Das’ various projects involving public spaces. Growth of urbanization is increasingly dividing our cities into disparate fragments, both in social and spatial terms. His contribution in preparing a participatory plan and design for the rehabilitation of 25000 evicted families from the National Park is probably the largest rehabilitation project in the country.
Thursday June 1st. Patrick Hwang Patrick Hwang is a visiting faculty to the Chair of Architecture & Public Building for the spring term of 2017. He is the Coordinator of Thesis Project and Architecture Explorer Programme at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) and previously served as Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona in Tucson. His experience lie in the design of public buildings, including the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Fresno Metropolitan Museum and Art Gallery of Ontario, and has coupled his interest in the public realm through the teaching of design studios and research of E.T. Boullée. Since 2010, he has been developing an empirical operational theory involving a transformative design process through real-world architectural projects. Within the Master of Architecture programme at CUHK, his studios have engaged, through the lens of public buildings, with the issues of collective memory, heritage adaptation and urban revitalization in the city of Hsinchu, Mumbai and Hong Kong. Patrick received his Architecture degrees from RISD and Columbia.
Thursday June 1st. Thomas Chung Thomas Chung is Associate Professor at the School of Architecture, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. He graduated from the University of Cambridge, and has practiced as a registered architect in the United Kingdom. His research interest involves understanding how architecture contributes to the urban order and culture of the modern city. His research focused on the interplay of architecture with urban representation and cultural imagination, and the metabolisms of urban vernacular in Hong Kong. Besides research, Chung is active in steering, curating and exhibiting at the Hong Kong & Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale of UrbanismArchitecture (UABB) both in Hong Kong and Shenzhen since 2008, as well as at the Venice Biennale in 2010 and 2014. He was co-curator for Refabricating City, the inaugural UABB(HK) 2008. Currently, he is on the Steering Committee for the Hong Kong & Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale of UrbanismArchitecture, and serves on the Board of Directors for the Hong Kong Architecture Centre. Following his multiple award-wining projects Value Farm in UABB(SZ) 2013 and Floating Fields in UABB(SZ) 2015 that fuse ecological design, productive landscape with socially innovative public space, Thomas is researching how ecological architectural strategies can combine with socio innovation to explore alternative sustainable designs.
Thursday June 1st. Pezo von Ellrichshausen Pezo and Von Ellrichshausen Architects currently work in Concepcion, southern Chile. With a cross production between Art and Architecture, the studio has built a series of singular houses, art pavilions and residential buildings. Their office has been awarded multiple prizes, such as The Mies Crown hall Americas Emerge Prize, and much of their work has been published and featured in exhibitions. Now, for the first time they will be sharing their knowledge at our faculty. Pezo and Von Ellrichshausen consider the that good architecture is somehow invisible, but it allows for whatever is happening in that space to be the very best experience possible. Together they bring an innate understanding of how people will respond and feel in a space and marry it with an absolute belief in an aesthetically pure architecture. It allows the individual to look beyond the elements and focus on other things.
Thursday June 1st. Winy Maas Winy Maas is one of the co-founding directors of the globally operating architecture and urban planning firm MVRDV, based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, known for projects such as the Expo 2000 and the vision for greater Paris, Grand Paris Plus Petit. He is also professor at and director of The Why Factory, a research institute for the future city. With both MVRDV and The Why Factory he has published a series of research projects on the future of cities. He has received the Order of the Dutch Lion from the Netherlands Government and has been made a Chevalier de la Légion D'honneur by the French Government for his contributions to the fields of Architecture and Urbanism. As increasing numbers of people wish to live in cities, Maas has been propagating the idea of the ‘bovenstad’. This implies creating buildings, gardens and parks on top of the existing roofs. This would enable gardens for highrise developments. He posits that the population densities in cities as Cairo, Tokyo and New York are are a lot higher than that in the Netherlands and that is proof that a high densification potential remains.
Speakers
Friday May 26th. Francine Houben Francine Houben began to formulate the three fundamental concepts of her architectural vision whilst studying at the Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. Designing primarily for People, constructing spaces that are relevant to Place, and forging connections that give a building Purpose have remained consistent, underlying values to Mecanoo’s practice over the past three decades. Always seeking inspiration in the details of specific sites and locations, Francine bases her work on precise analysis coupled with an intuition built over three decades. She interweaves social, technical, playful and human aspects of space-making together in order to create a unique solution to each architectural challenge. Francine combines the disciplines of architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture in an untraditional way, with a profound sensitivity for light and beauty. Her use of materials, which often contrast in a complementary way, are the sum total of her creative expression.
Friday May 26th. Arjen Knoester Arjen Knoester studied Urbanism and Housing at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture. His experience as a designer, guest lecturer, concept developer and coach enables him to to work in the fields of Urbanism and Architecture. Knoester is currently senior urban designer for the urban planning department of the city of Rotterdam and partner/owner at Morfis Architecture and Urbanism in The Hague. His approach assumes opportunities and stems from imaginative, analytical and conjunctive qualities to realize collective ambitions. Having been involved in the city expansion plan Nesselande and the redevelopment of the harbors, he is currently spearheading the development of the city of Rotterdam. At his own firm Morfis his expertise lies in the urban projects. He’s convinced knowing about the motivations of legislators, custodians and inhabitants is essential in area development and maintenance. With this and knowledge about the neighborhood, district or city, something can be developed that the citizens will feel connected to.
Saturday May 27th. Kees Kaan Kees Kaan is an architect based in Rotterdam where he’s directing KAAN Architecten together with partners Vincent Panhuysen and Dikkie Scipio. They are leading an international team of architects, landscape architects, urban planners, engineers and graphic designers. Beforehand he was the co-founder and leader of Claus en Kaan Architecten from 1987-2013.Kaan graduated in Architecture at TU Delft in 1987. Examples of his work are the Netherlands Forensic Institute in The Hague, the Netherlands Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique, the Heimolen Crematorium in Sint-Niklaas and the Supreme Court of the Netherlands in The Hague. As full professor he is currently holding the Chair of Complex Projects of the department of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology. His research focuses on large-scale projects that characterize rapid global urbanization. Kaan is an international lecturer and sits on various juries and boards, both in the Netherlands and abroad. Numerous books and exhibitions have been dedicated to his body of work.
Sunday May 28th. Sou Fujimoto Sou Fujimoto is known for being awarded the Golden Lion at the 2012 Venice biennale for the Best National Participation. The title which captures the spirit of Common Ground, was awarded to the Japanese Pavilion in which leading international architect Toyo Ito collaborated with younger architects and with the local community to address the design of a new center for a region devastated by a national disaster in a practical and imaginative way. Since graduating from the University of Tokyo in 1994 and establishing his own office in 1994, Fujimoto has been exploring various themes in his designs all of which further explored during the week. THE CROWD: How does the individual relate to the group? THE INDIVIDUAL: How does the body relate to the spaces? THE HOME: What is the relation between the interior and the exterior? THE CITY: What is the relation between the natural and the artificial? He states that through exploring these questions we can come to determine a vision of architecture itself. This vision has been elaborated throughout his working career with projects such as T house, House N, The final wooden house, NA House and the Serpentine Gallery as well as in his winning proposal for the the Reinventer Paris competition spearheaded by Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo.
Monday May 29th. Peter Russell Peter Russell is dean of the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment since 2015. Before this, Peter Russell was Professor of Computer Supported Planning in Architecture (CAAD) at the RWTH Aachen University. He is a partner in architectural practice IP Arch GmbH and serves as vice-chairman of the German Architecture Dean's Council (DARL). He is also a founding member of the newly formed European architectural research network ARENA. Russell holds a bachelor in Environmental Design Studies from the Technical University of Nova Scotia, where he also obtained a master’s degree in Architecture. His vision for education at TU Delft can be summarised by the three A’s. Africa, Automation and Agility. He believes the greatest challenges for us as architects, designers and urbanists lie in the the Global South and in the rapidly urbanising continent of Africa in particular. Automation creates additional challenges as it requires an overhaul of our current infrastructure to accommodate new modes of transporting people and goods. In order to tackle global and local challenges education should connect with the local environment and businesses.
Monday May 29th. Floris Alkemade After graduating with honours at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture he joined Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), becoming partner from 2001 until 2008 when he founded his own firm FAA. Currently directing FAA and FAA/XDGA, Alkemade works on complex projects both within the Netherlands and abroad. He stands out due to his attention for infrastructure and logistics. Themes such as rezoning and urban development are also an important part of his work. In his work as an architect and urban planner, Alkemade, professor at the Academy of Architecture since 2014, champions the idea of the ‘tabula scripta’ or the ‘marked slate’. The architect is forced to relate a lot more to the existing conditions and to design on the basis of these conditions. Instead of a restriction this should be an opportunity to build on the potential. Due to his dedication to embedding interventions within the urban and landscape structure he has been appointed Chief Government Architect (Rijksbouwmeester) of the Netherlands.
Monday May 29th. Meta Berghauser Pont Meta Berghauser Pont is associate professor in Urban Design and Planning at Chalmers University in Gothenburg and leads, together with Lars Marcus, the research group SMoG (Spatial Morphology Group). Her research focus is Urban Morphology specializing in the quantification of urban form. She developed the Spacematrix-model which shows the relation between urban density and building typologies and its performativity in terms of for instance daylight access and urbanity. Recently this method is integrated with what is known as Space Syntax, a method to measure centrality of the urban network. The overall aim is to help us understand how urban form through density and centrality can support social, economic and ecological processes such as social segregation, local markets and biodiversity. https://www.smog.chalmers.se/
Monday May 29th. Ronald Wall Prof. Dr. Ronald Wall holds the ‘Chair of Economic Development of the City of Johannesburg’, at the School of Economic and Business Sciences,University of the Witwatersrand (WITS), Johannesburg. The Chair bridges the Faculty of Commerce Law and Management and the Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, and is established by the Municipality of Johannesburg. He is also the Head of the Urban Competitiveness and Resilience department, at the Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies (IHS), Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR). Wall is a qualified architect, urban planner and economic geographer. He received his PhD in economic geography from the Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam. His research concerns global, regional and urban economic development, on topics such as regional integration, economic competitiveness, sustainable cities, world city analysis, smart cities, food security, urban inequality, infrastructure, renewable energy, green economy and happiness economics. Central to Wall’s work is the understanding of cities as spatial-economic systems that bridge local, regional and global scales. Currently Wall’s focus is on African city development - particularly the relationship between urban economics, urban planning and urban design. He is the principal researcher and author of the upcoming UN-Habitat report ‘State of African Cities 2018: The Geography of African Investment’, a partnership between UN-Habitat and IHS-Erasmus University Rotterdam.
Tuesday May 30. Machiel van Dorst Machiel van Dorst is the chair of the OTB research department at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture. The objective of the OTB department is to contribute to solutions for societal problems, especially those related to the built environment. The focus is on scientific impact and social relevance Van Dorst is an environmental designer and is specialized in environment behavior interaction and sustainable development. Behavior research and design is related to control, social safety, community design, child friendly cities, health and stress reduction through design. For sustainable development the emphasis is on the combination of livability and ecological design. In his research for the book Privacy Script he concludes that control is an important aspect of our lives. He posits that it is of greater importance than social interaction as the need of being with and without people can then be balanced. Architecture has to facilitate real interaction by creating the opportunity to interact without forcing it. Control over social interaction is always important everywhere.
Tuesday May 30. Jesper Henriksson Jesper Henriksson is founder of the architectural practice Hesselbrand, based in London and Oslo. Their research and design focuses on new forms of living and working for an unpredictable way of life. He participated in the Venice biennale 2016 with a proposal for a house that is defined by spatial conditions rather than specific functions, to allow for a different form of flexible space. In his work Henriksson uses models to capture spaces through abstraction. Hesselbrand have attempted to provide the spatial cues for particular social situations without the spaces in which they typically appear. As soon as something becomes functioning architecture it is difficult to view it as standing for anything else. It no longer possesses the cast of the globally representative, but becomes specifically, restrictively sited instead. It loses its status, somehow, as representative art; hence why these particular objects are ‘Models’. Were they anything more concrete they would cease to be so powerful as abstractions.
Wednesday May 31st. Iwo Borkowicz Iwo Borkowicz, a recent graduate from the Faculty of Architecture of the Catholic University of Leuven (KU Leuven), has been awarded the prize, intended to support and develop the talent of recently graduated architects, urban planners and landscape architects, by Fundaciùo Mies van der Rohe. For his project, “A Symbiotic Relation of Cooperative Social Housing and Dispersed Tourism in Havana Vieja”, Borkowicz travelled to Cuba to do his research. There he could see first-hand how increasing luxury tourism and poverty are linked in this city. This situation encouraged him to develop architectural prototypes, to combine small scale tourism, social housing and entrepreneurship within the existing landscape of Havana.
Wednesday May 31st. Pieter Stoutjesdijk Stoutjesdijk envisions a combination of open-source design and local computer-controlled manufacturing to herald in a new type of industry in which the benefits of design and production are accessible and ideas as well as technology will be shared freely. For the Haiti house, based on an open, online database of digital construction component blueprints he developed for his 2013 graduation project at Delft University of Technology, Stoutjesdijk had to balance simplicity, adaptability, local needs, efficient use of materials, production time, structural requirements to resist external forces (e.g. hurricane winds), ease of assembly, and aesthetics. One of the objectives of his promotion of open source architecture has been its potential to not just influence the current building stock, but most importantly the 99% of buildings that are currently not designed by architects. His preferred model would thereby be a hybrid between open-source and closed-course as this in his vision leads to much greater quality and could potentially profit all actors in the process.
Wednesday May 31st. PK Das PK Das currently works in Mumbai as an and has been awarded the 2016 Jane Jacobs Medal for his efforts leading to the introduction of citizen participation in the citywide planning process. He has collaborated with activists and journalists to bring democratic planning and design to residents in the slums of Mumbai, a city with just one square meter of public space per 1000 inhabitants. His current engagement in creating a comprehensive plan for slum redevelopment and integration, turning the fragmented areas and waterways into revitalized and rehabilitated public spaces, is noteworthy. Das believes that in any country, but more so in a diverse, populous and unevenly developing country like India, architecture as well as the larger umbrella of town planning needs to be inextricably connected with larger public aspirations and the highest democratic ideals. Establishing a close relationship between architecture and people, placing a strong emphasis on participatory planning from the very beginning and at every stage, are the keynotes of this approach that manifests in Das’ various projects involving public spaces. Growth of urbanization is increasingly dividing our cities into disparate fragments, both in social and spatial terms. His contribution in preparing a participatory plan and design for the rehabilitation of 25000 evicted families from the National Park is probably the largest rehabilitation project in the country.
Thursday June 1st. Patrick Hwang Patrick Hwang is a visiting faculty to the Chair of Architecture & Public Building for the spring term of 2017. He is the Coordinator of Thesis Project and Architecture Explorer Programme at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) and previously served as Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona in Tucson. His experience lie in the design of public buildings, including the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Fresno Metropolitan Museum and Art Gallery of Ontario, and has coupled his interest in the public realm through the teaching of design studios and research of E.T. Boullée. Since 2010, he has been developing an empirical operational theory involving a transformative design process through real-world architectural projects. Within the Master of Architecture programme at CUHK, his studios have engaged, through the lens of public buildings, with the issues of collective memory, heritage adaptation and urban revitalization in the city of Hsinchu, Mumbai and Hong Kong. Patrick received his Architecture degrees from RISD and Columbia.
Thursday June 1st. Thomas Chung Thomas Chung is Associate Professor at the School of Architecture, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. He graduated from the University of Cambridge, and has practiced as a registered architect in the United Kingdom. His research interest involves understanding how architecture contributes to the urban order and culture of the modern city. His research focused on the interplay of architecture with urban representation and cultural imagination, and the metabolisms of urban vernacular in Hong Kong. Besides research, Chung is active in steering, curating and exhibiting at the Hong Kong & Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale of UrbanismArchitecture (UABB) both in Hong Kong and Shenzhen since 2008, as well as at the Venice Biennale in 2010 and 2014. He was co-curator for Refabricating City, the inaugural UABB(HK) 2008. Currently, he is on the Steering Committee for the Hong Kong & Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale of UrbanismArchitecture, and serves on the Board of Directors for the Hong Kong Architecture Centre. Following his multiple award-wining projects Value Farm in UABB(SZ) 2013 and Floating Fields in UABB(SZ) 2015 that fuse ecological design, productive landscape with socially innovative public space, Thomas is researching how ecological architectural strategies can combine with socio innovation to explore alternative sustainable designs.
Thursday June 1st. Pezo von Ellrichshausen Pezo and Von Ellrichshausen Architects currently work in Concepcion, southern Chile. With a cross production between Art and Architecture, the studio has built a series of singular houses, art pavilions and residential buildings. Their office has been awarded multiple prizes, such as The Mies Crown hall Americas Emerge Prize, and much of their work has been published and featured in exhibitions. Now, for the first time they will be sharing their knowledge at our faculty. Pezo and Von Ellrichshausen consider the that good architecture is somehow invisible, but it allows for whatever is happening in that space to be the very best experience possible. Together they bring an innate understanding of how people will respond and feel in a space and marry it with an absolute belief in an aesthetically pure architecture. It allows the individual to look beyond the elements and focus on other things.
Thursday June 1st. Winy Maas Winy Maas is one of the co-founding directors of the globally operating architecture and urban planning firm MVRDV, based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, known for projects such as the Expo 2000 and the vision for greater Paris, Grand Paris Plus Petit. He is also professor at and director of The Why Factory, a research institute for the future city. With both MVRDV and The Why Factory he has published a series of research projects on the future of cities. He has received the Order of the Dutch Lion from the Netherlands Government and has been made a Chevalier de la Légion D'honneur by the French Government for his contributions to the fields of Architecture and Urbanism. As increasing numbers of people wish to live in cities, Maas has been propagating the idea of the ‘bovenstad’. This implies creating buildings, gardens and parks on top of the existing roofs. This would enable gardens for highrise developments. He posits that the population densities in cities as Cairo, Tokyo and New York are are a lot higher than that in the Netherlands and that is proof that a high densification potential remains.
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Speakers
Friday May 26th. Francine Houben Francine Houben began to formulate the three fundamental concepts of her architectural vision whilst studying at the Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. Designing primarily for People, constructing spaces that are relevant to Place, and forging connections that give a building Purpose have remained consistent, underlying values to Mecanoo’s practice over the past three decades. Always seeking inspiration in the details of specific sites and locations, Francine bases her work on precise analysis coupled with an intuition built over three decades. She interweaves social, technical, playful and human aspects of space-making together in order to create a unique solution to each architectural challenge. Francine combines the disciplines of architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture in an untraditional way, with a profound sensitivity for light and beauty. Her use of materials, which often contrast in a complementary way, are the sum total of her creative expression.
Friday May 26th. Arjen Knoester Arjen Knoester studied Urbanism and Housing at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture. His experience as a designer, guest lecturer, concept developer and coach enables him to to work in the fields of Urbanism and Architecture. Knoester is currently senior urban designer for the urban planning department of the city of Rotterdam and partner/owner at Morfis Architecture and Urbanism in The Hague. His approach assumes opportunities and stems from imaginative, analytical and conjunctive qualities to realize collective ambitions. Having been involved in the city expansion plan Nesselande and the redevelopment of the harbors, he is currently spearheading the development of the city of Rotterdam. At his own firm Morfis his expertise lies in the urban projects. He’s convinced knowing about the motivations of legislators, custodians and inhabitants is essential in area development and maintenance. With this and knowledge about the neighborhood, district or city, something can be developed that the citizens will feel connected to.
Saturday May 27th. Kees Kaan Kees Kaan is an architect based in Rotterdam where he’s directing KAAN Architecten together with partners Vincent Panhuysen and Dikkie Scipio. They are leading an international team of architects, landscape architects, urban planners, engineers and graphic designers. Beforehand he was the co-founder and leader of Claus en Kaan Architecten from 1987-2013.Kaan graduated in Architecture at TU Delft in 1987. Examples of his work are the Netherlands Forensic Institute in The Hague, the Netherlands Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique, the Heimolen Crematorium in Sint-Niklaas and the Supreme Court of the Netherlands in The Hague. As full professor he is currently holding the Chair of Complex Projects of the department of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology. His research focuses on large-scale projects that characterize rapid global urbanization. Kaan is an international lecturer and sits on various juries and boards, both in the Netherlands and abroad. Numerous books and exhibitions have been dedicated to his body of work.
Sunday May 28th. Sou Fujimoto Sou Fujimoto is known for being awarded the Golden Lion at the 2012 Venice biennale for the Best National Participation. The title which captures the spirit of Common Ground, was awarded to the Japanese Pavilion in which leading international architect Toyo Ito collaborated with younger architects and with the local community to address the design of a new center for a region devastated by a national disaster in a practical and imaginative way. Since graduating from the University of Tokyo in 1994 and establishing his own office in 1994, Fujimoto has been exploring various themes in his designs all of which further explored during the week. THE CROWD: How does the individual relate to the group? THE INDIVIDUAL: How does the body relate to the spaces? THE HOME: What is the relation between the interior and the exterior? THE CITY: What is the relation between the natural and the artificial? He states that through exploring these questions we can come to determine a vision of architecture itself. This vision has been elaborated throughout his working career with projects such as T house, House N, The final wooden house, NA House and the Serpentine Gallery as well as in his winning proposal for the the Reinventer Paris competition spearheaded by Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo.
Monday May 29th. Peter Russell Peter Russell is dean of the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment since 2015. Before this, Peter Russell was Professor of Computer Supported Planning in Architecture (CAAD) at the RWTH Aachen University. He is a partner in architectural practice IP Arch GmbH and serves as vice-chairman of the German Architecture Dean's Council (DARL). He is also a founding member of the newly formed European architectural research network ARENA. Russell holds a bachelor in Environmental Design Studies from the Technical University of Nova Scotia, where he also obtained a master’s degree in Architecture. His vision for education at TU Delft can be summarised by the three A’s. Africa, Automation and Agility. He believes the greatest challenges for us as architects, designers and urbanists lie in the the Global South and in the rapidly urbanising continent of Africa in particular. Automation creates additional challenges as it requires an overhaul of our current infrastructure to accommodate new modes of transporting people and goods. In order to tackle global and local challenges education should connect with the local environment and businesses.
Monday May 29th. Floris Alkemade After graduating with honours at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture he joined Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), becoming partner from 2001 until 2008 when he founded his own firm FAA. Currently directing FAA and FAA/XDGA, Alkemade works on complex projects both within the Netherlands and abroad. He stands out due to his attention for infrastructure and logistics. Themes such as rezoning and urban development are also an important part of his work. In his work as an architect and urban planner, Alkemade, professor at the Academy of Architecture since 2014, champions the idea of the ‘tabula scripta’ or the ‘marked slate’. The architect is forced to relate a lot more to the existing conditions and to design on the basis of these conditions. Instead of a restriction this should be an opportunity to build on the potential. Due to his dedication to embedding interventions within the urban and landscape structure he has been appointed Chief Government Architect (Rijksbouwmeester) of the Netherlands.
Monday May 29th. Meta Berghauser Pont Meta Berghauser Pont is associate professor in Urban Design and Planning at Chalmers University in Gothenburg and leads, together with Lars Marcus, the research group SMoG (Spatial Morphology Group). Her research focus is Urban Morphology specializing in the quantification of urban form. She developed the Spacematrix-model which shows the relation between urban density and building typologies and its performativity in terms of for instance daylight access and urbanity. Recently this method is integrated with what is known as Space Syntax, a method to measure centrality of the urban network. The overall aim is to help us understand how urban form through density and centrality can support social, economic and ecological processes such as social segregation, local markets and biodiversity. https://www.smog.chalmers.se/
Monday May 29th. Ronald Wall Prof. Dr. Ronald Wall holds the ‘Chair of Economic Development of the City of Johannesburg’, at the School of Economic and Business Sciences,University of the Witwatersrand (WITS), Johannesburg. The Chair bridges the Faculty of Commerce Law and Management and the Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, and is established by the Municipality of Johannesburg. He is also the Head of the Urban Competitiveness and Resilience department, at the Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies (IHS), Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR). Wall is a qualified architect, urban planner and economic geographer. He received his PhD in economic geography from the Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam. His research concerns global, regional and urban economic development, on topics such as regional integration, economic competitiveness, sustainable cities, world city analysis, smart cities, food security, urban inequality, infrastructure, renewable energy, green economy and happiness economics. Central to Wall’s work is the understanding of cities as spatial-economic systems that bridge local, regional and global scales. Currently Wall’s focus is on African city development - particularly the relationship between urban economics, urban planning and urban design. He is the principal researcher and author of the upcoming UN-Habitat report ‘State of African Cities 2018: The Geography of African Investment’, a partnership between UN-Habitat and IHS-Erasmus University Rotterdam.
Tuesday May 30. Machiel van Dorst Machiel van Dorst is the chair of the OTB research department at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture. The objective of the OTB department is to contribute to solutions for societal problems, especially those related to the built environment. The focus is on scientific impact and social relevance Van Dorst is an environmental designer and is specialized in environment behavior interaction and sustainable development. Behavior research and design is related to control, social safety, community design, child friendly cities, health and stress reduction through design. For sustainable development the emphasis is on the combination of livability and ecological design. In his research for the book Privacy Script he concludes that control is an important aspect of our lives. He posits that it is of greater importance than social interaction as the need of being with and without people can then be balanced. Architecture has to facilitate real interaction by creating the opportunity to interact without forcing it. Control over social interaction is always important everywhere.
Tuesday May 30. Jesper Henriksson Jesper Henriksson is founder of the architectural practice Hesselbrand, based in London and Oslo. Their research and design focuses on new forms of living and working for an unpredictable way of life. He participated in the Venice biennale 2016 with a proposal for a house that is defined by spatial conditions rather than specific functions, to allow for a different form of flexible space. In his work Henriksson uses models to capture spaces through abstraction. Hesselbrand have attempted to provide the spatial cues for particular social situations without the spaces in which they typically appear. As soon as something becomes functioning architecture it is difficult to view it as standing for anything else. It no longer possesses the cast of the globally representative, but becomes specifically, restrictively sited instead. It loses its status, somehow, as representative art; hence why these particular objects are ‘Models’. Were they anything more concrete they would cease to be so powerful as abstractions.
Wednesday May 31st. Iwo Borkowicz Iwo Borkowicz, a recent graduate from the Faculty of Architecture of the Catholic University of Leuven (KU Leuven), has been awarded the prize, intended to support and develop the talent of recently graduated architects, urban planners and landscape architects, by Fundaciùo Mies van der Rohe. For his project, “A Symbiotic Relation of Cooperative Social Housing and Dispersed Tourism in Havana Vieja”, Borkowicz travelled to Cuba to do his research. There he could see first-hand how increasing luxury tourism and poverty are linked in this city. This situation encouraged him to develop architectural prototypes, to combine small scale tourism, social housing and entrepreneurship within the existing landscape of Havana.
Wednesday May 31st. Pieter Stoutjesdijk Stoutjesdijk envisions a combination of open-source design and local computer-controlled manufacturing to herald in a new type of industry in which the benefits of design and production are accessible and ideas as well as technology will be shared freely. For the Haiti house, based on an open, online database of digital construction component blueprints he developed for his 2013 graduation project at Delft University of Technology, Stoutjesdijk had to balance simplicity, adaptability, local needs, efficient use of materials, production time, structural requirements to resist external forces (e.g. hurricane winds), ease of assembly, and aesthetics. One of the objectives of his promotion of open source architecture has been its potential to not just influence the current building stock, but most importantly the 99% of buildings that are currently not designed by architects. His preferred model would thereby be a hybrid between open-source and closed-course as this in his vision leads to much greater quality and could potentially profit all actors in the process.
Wednesday May 31st. PK Das PK Das currently works in Mumbai as an and has been awarded the 2016 Jane Jacobs Medal for his efforts leading to the introduction of citizen participation in the citywide planning process. He has collaborated with activists and journalists to bring democratic planning and design to residents in the slums of Mumbai, a city with just one square meter of public space per 1000 inhabitants. His current engagement in creating a comprehensive plan for slum redevelopment and integration, turning the fragmented areas and waterways into revitalized and rehabilitated public spaces, is noteworthy. Das believes that in any country, but more so in a diverse, populous and unevenly developing country like India, architecture as well as the larger umbrella of town planning needs to be inextricably connected with larger public aspirations and the highest democratic ideals. Establishing a close relationship between architecture and people, placing a strong emphasis on participatory planning from the very beginning and at every stage, are the keynotes of this approach that manifests in Das’ various projects involving public spaces. Growth of urbanization is increasingly dividing our cities into disparate fragments, both in social and spatial terms. His contribution in preparing a participatory plan and design for the rehabilitation of 25000 evicted families from the National Park is probably the largest rehabilitation project in the country.
Thursday June 1st. Patrick Hwang Patrick Hwang is a visiting faculty to the Chair of Architecture & Public Building for the spring term of 2017. He is the Coordinator of Thesis Project and Architecture Explorer Programme at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) and previously served as Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona in Tucson. His experience lie in the design of public buildings, including the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Fresno Metropolitan Museum and Art Gallery of Ontario, and has coupled his interest in the public realm through the teaching of design studios and research of E.T. Boullée. Since 2010, he has been developing an empirical operational theory involving a transformative design process through real-world architectural projects. Within the Master of Architecture programme at CUHK, his studios have engaged, through the lens of public buildings, with the issues of collective memory, heritage adaptation and urban revitalization in the city of Hsinchu, Mumbai and Hong Kong. Patrick received his Architecture degrees from RISD and Columbia.
Thursday June 1st. Thomas Chung Thomas Chung is Associate Professor at the School of Architecture, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. He graduated from the University of Cambridge, and has practiced as a registered architect in the United Kingdom. His research interest involves understanding how architecture contributes to the urban order and culture of the modern city. His research focused on the interplay of architecture with urban representation and cultural imagination, and the metabolisms of urban vernacular in Hong Kong. Besides research, Chung is active in steering, curating and exhibiting at the Hong Kong & Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale of UrbanismArchitecture (UABB) both in Hong Kong and Shenzhen since 2008, as well as at the Venice Biennale in 2010 and 2014. He was co-curator for Refabricating City, the inaugural UABB(HK) 2008. Currently, he is on the Steering Committee for the Hong Kong & Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale of UrbanismArchitecture, and serves on the Board of Directors for the Hong Kong Architecture Centre. Following his multiple award-wining projects Value Farm in UABB(SZ) 2013 and Floating Fields in UABB(SZ) 2015 that fuse ecological design, productive landscape with socially innovative public space, Thomas is researching how ecological architectural strategies can combine with socio innovation to explore alternative sustainable designs.
Thursday June 1st. Pezo von Ellrichshausen Pezo and Von Ellrichshausen Architects currently work in Concepcion, southern Chile. With a cross production between Art and Architecture, the studio has built a series of singular houses, art pavilions and residential buildings. Their office has been awarded multiple prizes, such as The Mies Crown hall Americas Emerge Prize, and much of their work has been published and featured in exhibitions. Now, for the first time they will be sharing their knowledge at our faculty. Pezo and Von Ellrichshausen consider the that good architecture is somehow invisible, but it allows for whatever is happening in that space to be the very best experience possible. Together they bring an innate understanding of how people will respond and feel in a space and marry it with an absolute belief in an aesthetically pure architecture. It allows the individual to look beyond the elements and focus on other things.
Thursday June 1st. Winy Maas Winy Maas is one of the co-founding directors of the globally operating architecture and urban planning firm MVRDV, based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, known for projects such as the Expo 2000 and the vision for greater Paris, Grand Paris Plus Petit. He is also professor at and director of The Why Factory, a research institute for the future city. With both MVRDV and The Why Factory he has published a series of research projects on the future of cities. He has received the Order of the Dutch Lion from the Netherlands Government and has been made a Chevalier de la Légion D'honneur by the French Government for his contributions to the fields of Architecture and Urbanism. As increasing numbers of people wish to live in cities, Maas has been propagating the idea of the ‘bovenstad’. This implies creating buildings, gardens and parks on top of the existing roofs. This would enable gardens for highrise developments. He posits that the population densities in cities as Cairo, Tokyo and New York are are a lot higher than that in the Netherlands and that is proof that a high densification potential remains.